Five tips to keep cool this summer

 

31 July 2018Image: Friends in garden with glasses of water

While the sun is out there are a number of reasons why it is most important to stay safe in the sun and keep cool.

Summer should be the time when demand for heating is at its lowest, and you may even need some cooling in your home.

In warmer months, it's tempting to use Air Conditioning fans. But these aren't the only tricks to keeping cool.

There are plenty of ways to buffer your home from the heat without using energy therefore maximising savings. So here are some tips on how to stay cool in the summer.

Making the most of the heating in your homes

Summer should be the time when demand for heating is at its lowest, and you may even need some cooling in your home. Here are three simple tricks you can try to adjust the heating in your home:
  • Turn your heating down/ off – don’t forget to adjust inputs of night storage heaters so they do not charge over-night, if they do they will still bleed heat during the day and make the room uncomfortably warm and waste energy!
  • Images: ThermostatKeep room thermostats low to avoid the central heating coming on.
  • You may find you can also adjust the time your hot water is on for, as you’ll need slightly less

Keep curtains and Blinds closed - Closing the blinds and or curtains prevents your home from becoming a miniature greenhouse, particularly on south facing windows as up to 30% of heat in the home will come from sunlight through the windows in the summer.

It’s a good idea to do this if you’re going out of the house as you’ll then return to a cooler home. Remember if you are in during the day to adjust which curtains are closed as the suns position changes throughout the day.

Images: Glass of waterFocus keeping yourself cool, not the building

Always keep well hydrated in warm weather and this will help your body to stay cool. Try sipping tasty iced drinks to applying a cold cloth to strong-pulsed areas like your neck and wrists, cooling yourself from the inside out is not a bad idea.

Be smart about your clothing choices, light cotton clothing is best for warm weather.
 

Open the right windows

Opening the top windows on the sunny side of the house and lower windows on the shaded side of the house will help to create airflow and allow warm air to escape. Always try to open windows (where possible on opposite sides of the property. Most modern windows have a secure opening function to ensure the housing is still secure and safe. Ensure that if you are leaving your home, to close all windows and doors, closing the blinds and curtains will prevent the home heating up.

Image: Opening windowTemperatures will drop during the night. Make the most of these refreshing hours by cracking the windows before you go to bed. Just be sure to close the windows and blinds before things get too hot in the morning.
Insulation

Loft and cavity wall insulation not only helps to keep heat in during the winter, but also keeps heat out during the summer. In particular loft insulation also prevents the heat accumulating in the day from entering the house.

If you do still need to use a fan, use these tips to get the most out of it.
 

Position fans correctly

Fans should either be focused on pulling cool air into your home, or expelling warm air. So if you are in a shaded room, place the fan near an open window (partially or fully) directing air iImage: Fan infront of windown to the room. Placing a bowl filled with ice or cold water in front of a large fan so the air flows over the cool water bowl, will provide a cooler feel to the fan air.

If you are in a sunny room, the fan should ideally be close to a higher window opening and directing air out of the window. Remember to have a window on the cool side of the home partially open to create an air flow.
Turn on your kitchen and bathroom fans.

These fans are designed to remove warmer air from these rooms, and are generally low energy fans, so turning them on and leaving bathroom and kitchen doors open will help to create airflow.

CAN Project

This information is provided by the CAN (Climate Active Neighbourhoods). The project is an international partnership, consisting of German, Belgian, Dutch, French and British partners.

For more information about our Energy and Environment projects click here.